#FantasyFootball: Should I add Giovani Bernard and/or Doug Martin, or neither?

As Week 4 of the NFL season approaches, TBD sits at 1-2. I recently asked who I should attempt to trade for in order to make the team better. So far, the public has picked Brandon Marshall as the trade target, with Andre Johnson going the other way. I’ve proposed this trade to Marshall’s owner with a message asking what he/she wanted for Marshall. So we’ll wait and see with that. In other transaction news, both Giovani Bernard and Doug Martin have hit the waiver wire. Should I add either of these players, or do I have enough running back depth? Let me know in the usual ways (Twitter: @BenRosener /@knowhitter272, comments, and/or the poll below).

(I’m leaving most all of this up to you guys, even the team name. So long as it’s not vulgar or offensive, send me your suggestions on Twitter @BenRosener /@knowhitter272  or in the comments.)

The Case for Giovani Bernard

Giovani Bernard Fantasy

Bernard is stuck in a timeshare with Jeremy Hill, who entered the season as the starter in Cincinnati. However, that hasn’t stopped Bernard from ranking fifteenth in scoring amongst fantasy running backs. Hill scored twice in Week 1, racking up 18 points in the process, but has struggled since. He fumbled twice in Week 2 en route to 39 yards on 10 carries. He finished with -1 fantasy points. Week 3 brought a slight improvement, but not much. Hill had 12 carries for 21 yards and two fantasy points.

The stat line for Bernard is extremely different. The running back had eight fantasy points in the first game of the season before taking full advantage of Hill’s fumbles in Week 2. Bernard ran for 123 yards on 20 carries (13 fantasy points). He followed that up with 49 yards on 13 carries in Week 3. He managed seven fantasy points last week.

Both figure to hold value with the Bengals playing so well. One is bound to feature as the team’s top back, and judging on recent performances, that could be Bernard.

The Case for Doug Martin

Doug Martin Fantasy

Martin has been Tampa’s lead back this season, amassing 46 carries over only three games. While those three carries have only gone for 176 yards, having an unquestioned starting running back (no matter what team they play for) can be valuable in fantasy. If nothing else, you know they will get consistent carries each week.

Bobby Rainey and Charles Sims will get looks going forward,

There’s potential with Martin, but just like Bernard, there is risk. He hasn’t come close to equaling his 2012 numbers when he ran for 1,454 yards and 11 touchdowns in addition to 472 receiving yards and another score through the air.

#FantasyFootball Trade Targets: Melvin Gordon, Larry Fitzgerald, C.J. Anderson, Brandon Marshall and Tyler Eifert

Early votes are in and Arian Foster is the current leader in the race for starting running back in the TBD TBD starting lineup for Week 4 in the NFL.

If you’d like to vote on that (other options include Marshawn Lynch, Todd Gurley and David Johnson) head on over to this link and find the schmancy/snazzy poll at the bottom.

This post, however, will be dedicated to trade targets. TBD TBD is dedicated to trade targets.

(I’m leaving most all of this up to you guys, even the team name. So long as it’s not vulgar or offensive, send me your suggestions on Twitter @BenRosener /@knowhitter272  or in the comments.)

With that in mind, here are some players that could make sense on the team. Vote and decide who you want TBD to try and acquire. If you want more info on the players, check out the bits below.

The Case for Melvin Gordon

Maybe a luxury given the team’s current personnel, but you can never have enough running backs. It would be a different story if Arian Foster and Marshawn Lynch weren’t injury concerns, but here we sit. Additionally, Dion Lewis is in an offense that can be extremely fickle towards running backs. Another of the team’s backs, David Johnson, is low on the depth chart in Arizona while Todd Gurley is stuck in a time share.

Gordon hasn’t established himself as a pass catcher in San Diego’s offense yet, but he does seem to be ahead of the pack in terms of rushing. The rookie is extremely talented and could be in for a breakout if he receives the lion’s share of the snaps during passing and rushing downs.

The Case for Larry Fitzgerald

While Gordon is somewhat of a luxury, Fitzgerald is a definite need. Randall Cobb is a must-start every week, but outside of that there aren’t any other locks. John Brown could be in for a breakout here soon, and is clearly Arizona’s second receiver, but hasn’t put up the fantasy points many expected. He’s been respectable so far with 20 points in three games, but that isn’t going to cut it as a starting receiver. Adding Fitzgerald would allow Brown to be worked into the mix at the FLEX slot, where (given his current production) he is a much more appealing play. Did I mention Larry Fitzgerald has 333 yards and five touchdowns over his first three games? Yeah, guy’s pretty good.

The Case for C.J. Anderson

The ultimate low-buy candidate, Anderson has struggled out of the gate. The Denver Broncos’ running back has managed only 74 yards on 32 carries. He has six catches on ten targets for 30 yards. Anderson has zero touchdowns this season. There’s talk of him losing his starting place in the Denver offense, but personally I don’t buy it. Anderson has been banged up with injuries as of late. Once healthy, he should claim the majority of the touches. His production means he can be had for cheap.

The Case for Brandon Marshall

Very similar to Fitzgerald in the sense that TBD needs high-end receivers. Marshall has scored in all three games this season, while eclipsing 100 yards in each of the last two contests. Overall, he’s netted owners 42 points. Translation: He’s a lock for double digit fantasy points, especially when you consider that the Jets don’t have a ton of weapons. Marshall will continue to get looks in New York.

The Case for Tyler Eifert

Eifert seems to have established himself as a secondary target in a suddenly pass-happy Cincinnati offense. He’ll always play second-fiddle to A.J. Green, but that should be fine for fantasy owners as long as Eifert is a prominent pass-catching option in the Cincy aerial attack. He had zero catches last week, so now could be a time to buy low. Additionally, tight end is the weakest position on TBD TBD’s roster, so there is a definite need.  

Here’s the team roster. Let me know who I should trade for any one of Gordon, Fitzgerald, Anderson, Marshall and/or Eifert.

Fantasy Football Advice Roster Fantasy Football Advice Bench

(Note: At this point, Andrew Luck, Randle, Foster, Cobb, Lynch, Gurley and Brown are untouchable either because of production or potential. Everyone else is in play).

Ultimately, you decide what propositions I make, so put on your GM hat and send me your trade ideas on Twitter (@BenRosener / @knowhitter272) or in the comments.

For more about TBD, as well as the current season in Fantasy Football, click here. 

#FantasyFootball Team: Week 3 Recap, Week 4 Lineup Decisions


The TBD TBD (you can still change the name if you want. Drop me a suggestion on Twitter @BenRosener or @knowhitter272 or in the comments, providing it’s not vulgar, spam or offensive) finally won a game! Week 3 around the NFL was kind to the TBDs as the team won 106-77. Despite underwhelming fantasy days from a number of starters, the team pulled through thanks to monster days from Joseph Randle and Randall Cobb. The duo combined for 55 points while Andrew Luck and Dion Lewis chipped in with 16 and 12 respectively.


While Week 3 was a solid result for the team, Week 4 is fast approaching. Lewis’s New England Patriots have a bye this week, so Lewis won’t start. The options are to slot Marshawn Lynch into the other running back slot and field a different FLEX, or start someone like Arian Foster, or another bench option in Lewis’ spot.

Starting Lineup

Should Foster start for his team, the Houston Texans, he would provide an appealing fantasy play this week against the Atlanta Falcons—the team that allowed Randle to run for 87 yards and three scores. Todd Gurley is another option to start. The rookie has massive potential, but could be stuck in a timeshare situation in St. Louis. Arizona’s David Johnson has been effective in limited touches for the Cardinals. Should he surpass Chris Johnson on the depth chart, he’ll have plenty of upside.

Voice your opinion below.

Be sure to voice your opinion. Vote in one of the polls, send me a Tweet @BenRosener or@knowhitter272 or comment below. I want to hear from you!

For more, click here. 

Why We Love Seattle: Mariners Fans Chant “Brady Cheated” During Mariners/Red Sox Game

Vine Video of the Day: Pete Carroll Videobombs John Clayton on Live TV

Seahawks Acquire Jimmy Graham

The latest per Jay Glazer of Fox Sports-

The Seahawks haven’t announced anything yet, but knowing how good Glazer is, you can probably expect something official soon.

I guess they didn’t want to waste time in finding Zach Miller’s replacement.

Graham lead the NFL in touchdown catches in 2013 with 16 and had 10 last season. Since 2011, he has 46 touchdown receptions and 4396 yards. His presence, along with Marshawn Lynch, will give the Seahawks two of the best red zone players in the league. Not to mention Russell Wilson, who isn’t too shabby of a player either.

All stats courtesy of http://www.pro-football-reference.com/ unless otherwise noted.

NBA Trade Deadline Winners and Losers: Winner- Philadelphia 76ers

The NBA trade deadline has always played second fiddle to Major League Baseball’s trade deadline. While it will always trump the NFL’s generally underwhelming trade deadline, it lived up to the annual precedence set by baseball with a bevy of moves that shocked not only based on volume in terms of but also because of the prominent players being moved like Isaiah Thomas and Goran Dragic.

(That’s three “trade deadline mentions! If this article gets six, everyone gets a free haircut at Supercuts and beef jerky from 7-Eleven!).



On the surface, Philly’s deadline deals are bizarre. They took on JaVale McGee’s $12 million salary for next season while essentially dealing cornerstone Michael Carter-Williams and promising rotation player K.J. McDaniels for Isaiah Canaan, a first-round pick and a second-round pick.

However, upon closer examination, the deals aren’t that crazy. The Sixers had the salary-cap space to absorb McGee, and essentially got him free along with a protected first-round pick in this year’s draft. If the former Denver center can regain any of the form he’s shown when full-strength, then some team might take a flier on him, leading to further assets. The fact that his contract expires after next year makes him even more appealing in a trade, possibly at some point next season. Plus, they get a first-round pick out of the deal. It’s likely a pick somewhere in the early twenties, but still… they received all this for the rights to draft-and-stash pick Cenk Akyol, a 27-year-old who’s held the “draft and stash” distinction for 11 years.

While McGee’s acquisition seemed somewhat logical, the loss of Carter-Williams and McDaniels can seem little puzzling. After all, Carter-Williams was still on his rookie deal and averaged 16 points, 6.7 assists and 6.2 rebounds per game in a season and a half in Philadelphia. McDaniels was a former second-round pick averaging 9.2 points off the bench.

So why is this a win for the Sixers if they dealt a promising young point guard and a potential long-term rotation player?

Even with Carter-Williams, the Sixers were going to stink for a while before they got better. The reality is that if he stayed in Philly he’d probably be pretty expensive salary wise by the time the team was contending again. Trading him for a first-round pick (originally the Lakers’ pick, which is top-five protected this year) allows the team draft a potential impact player, similar to what Carter-Williams would have been, only they get to paying him after his rookie contract later rather than sooner—when the Sixers will likely be contenders.

There’s also the question of how good the young point guard real is. Sure, his per-game numbers look good on paper, but how much of that had to do with how bad Philadelphia is? The tanking Sixers’ lack of comparative talent has turned Evan Turner and Tony Wroten into 17 points-per-game scorers. Both are good players, but 17 points a night? Probably not on a better team where they’d play fewer minutes. Case in point, Turner averaged only seven points a contest after being dealt to Indiana halfway through last season. That’s not to say Carter-Williams is going to be limited to seven points per outing with Milwaukee, but the extra minutes and shots garnered by Carter-Williams in Philly make it hard to truly gage his talent.

The last part of Philadelphia’s deadline dealings was shipping McDaniels to Houston for Isaiah Canaan and a second-round pick.

Again, why deal McDaniels?

Firstly because he only signed a one-year deal as his rookie contract, turning down a multi-year offer to gamble on himself in order to garner a larger contract in free agency. So far, the gamble has paid off. McDaniels averaged 9.2 points and 3.8 rebounds a game, not bad production for a second-round pick in his rookie season. He’ll likely garner a multi-million dollar, multi-year deal in the offseason, something Sixers’ GM Sam Hinkie apparently wasn’t willing to pay.

The same logic used with Carter-Williams can likely be used here. McDaniels was likely going to be somewhat costly (not as much as Carter-Williams, but still much more than what he’s making now) by the time the Sixers are in a position to contend. By dealing him now, they are able to take a flier on Canaan as Carter-Williams’ replacement while also recouping a second-round pick. That pick will come from either Minnesota or Denver, two of the worst teams in the league. Because of that, the Sixers could be looking at an early-second round draft choice. Due to the pick’s proximity to the first-round in terms of talent level, and lack of comparative financial commitment, they can be very appealing to teams.

Check back for more winners and losers of the trade deadline, including thoughts on what Phoenix and Milwaukee did, plus the lack of action on the Lakers part.

All stats courtesy of http://www.basketball-reference.com/ unless otherwise noted.