10 Stats from the #Detroit #Tigers 13-1 Win vs the #Minnesota #Twins

Because I missed the last game, here are twice the stats from the Detroit Tigers blowout win over the Minnesota Twins.

  • Five

The number of runs driven in by Miguel Cabrera. Miggy went yard twice and scored three runs on three hits. He went 3-for-5.

  • Zero

The number of runs allowed by the Tigers bullpen. The ‘pen accounted for only one inning, but Al Alburquerque threw a scoreless ninth, striking out one in the process.

  • Eight

The number of innings pitched by Detroit starter Anibal Sanchez. The former Marlin was superb in a start that suggests his troubles could be behind him. Sanchez allowed five hits, a walk and a run (it was earned) to go along with nine strikeouts. He’s back.

  • Four

The number of Tigers with three or more hits. Forget multiple hits in general, Rajai Davis, Bryan Holaday, Cabrera and Ian Kinsler all had at least three base hits. Gose led the way with four.

  • One

The number of Tigers starters who didn’t score a run. That starter would be Jose Iglesias, who went 1-for-5. While he didn’t score a run, he did drive one in.

  • 20

The number of hits by the Tigers as a team, four times more than the Twins hit total.

  • 1/1

J.D. Martinez’ strikeout-to-walk ratio for the game. The slugger struck out 126 times last season compared to only 30 walks. He’s already earned 13 base-on-balls this season in only 34 games. He had 30 walks in 123 games last season. His batting average may be down, but his walk total certainly looks to be on the rise.

  • .348

Anthony Gose’s batting average on the season. Gose isn’t starting every day, but is making the most of limited playing time. The centerfielder has 16 runs scored, ten extra-base hits, and six stolen bases in only 92 at-bats.

  • 4/5

The Tigers’ strikeout-to-walk ratio on the day. By comparison, the Twins strikeout-to-walk ratio was 10/1 in favor of strikeouts.

  • .240

Nick Castellanos’ batting average after the game. Castellanos stuffed the stat sheet with two hits, two runs scored, an RBI and two walks.

For more Tigers, click here. For more baseball, click here. For more Tigers stats, click here. 

5 Stats from the Detroit #Tigers’ 2-1 Win over the Minnesota Twins

  • One

Reliever Angel Nesbitt’s win total after the game. It was the reliever’s first big-league win. Ironically, he picked up the loss in the previous game.

  • Three

The number of players subbed into the game after Nick Castellanos was removed. Andrew Romine came in as a defensive replacement before making way for pinch-hitter Rajai Davis. Hernan Perez later entered to play third base.

  • Zero

The number of runs allowed by the Tigers bullpen after another strong showing from Alfredo Simon. Joba Chamberlain, Joakim Soria and Nesbitt combined to throw 2.1 scoreless innings with four strikeouts. They collectively allowed only one hit.

  • Six

The number of hits allowed by Alfredo Simon in 7.2 innings pitched. Simon allowed a run and a walk while striking out six.

  • Five

The number of Tigers regulars with a batting average above .280 following the game. Yoenis Cespedes is the low man on the totem pole with a .281 average, but Ian Kinsler, Anthony Gose, Miguel Cabrera and Jose Iglesias are all hitting over .300. Iglesias leads the way with a stellar .349 mark.

For more Tigers, click here. For more baseball, click here. For more Tigers stats, click here. 

5 Stats to Know from the Detroit Tigers 10-7 Win vs the Minnesota Twins

The Tigers have won yet another series, taking two-out-of-three in Minnesota. Here are five stats to know from the 10-7 triumph.

  • Four

The number of runs driven in by Miguel Cabrera. Miggy went 3-for-5 with the four RBI and two runs scored.

  • 17

The number of hits by the Tigers offense just a day after managing three against Mike Pelfrey and friends.

  • One

The number of home runs by rookie James McCann. It was the catcher’s first career, big-league homer. It also happened to be an inside-the-parker. J.D. Martinez also went yard, though the pitch that he hit actually left the yard, while Cabrera continue to show his ridiculous skill at the plate with two home runs.

  • Seven

The number of runs surrendered by Shane Greene in just 4.1 innings pitched. He’s now given up 15 runs on 18 hits in his past 8.1 innings after allowing two runs in his first 23 innings pitched as a Tiger. To Greene’s credit he struck out a season-high eight batters and didn’t walk anyone.

  • Six

The number of Tigers players to post multi-hit games. Andrew Romine, making a start at shortstop, had a hit in all four of his at-bats. Cabrera and McCann weren’t far behind with three hits apiece while Ian Kinsler, Yoenis Cespedes and Nick Castellanos all had two hits each.

For more Tigers, click here. For more baseball, click here. Follow the site on Twitter here.  You can find me on Twitter here.

5 Stats from the Detroit Tigers 3-2 Loss to the Minnesota Twins

  • Three

The number of hits the Tigers accumulated. Anthony Gose, J.D. Martinez and Yoenis Cespedes were the only Detroit players to notch a hit. The Tigers only added two walks, both coming from Alex Avila. Twins leadoff hitter Danny Santana had the same number of hits as the entire Detroit lineup.

  • Zero

The number of runs allowed by Blaine Hardy and Al Alburquerque in an inning of work. Both lowered their ERAs which sat at 7.36 and 11.37 respectively entering the game.

(RELATED: Should the Tigers Sign Rafael Soriano?)

  • .355

Miguel Cabrera’s ridiculous average after the game despite going 0-for-4 with a strikeout. Best hitter in the league. Period.

  • Two

The aforementioned number of walks by Avila. The fact that the catcher can draw walks is a positive sign going forward if Avila can’t significantly raise his average above .171.

  • Seven

The number of strikeouts by Tigers hitters. In a close game with a dearth of offense, a 7/2 strikeout-to-walk ratio isn’t great, or even close to being called “good”.

For more Tigers, click here. For more baseball, click here. Follow the site on Twitter here. 

5 Stats to Know from the Tigers 2-0 Win vs the Pirates

  • 1

The minimum number of times ever Tigers starting position player reached base. Rajai Davis and Jose Iglesias contributed two hits and a walk each while every other starting position player, with the exception of Alex Avila, registered a hit. Avila drew a walk and scored a run in three plate appearances.

  • 8

The number of shutout innings thrown by new Tiger Shane Greene. The former Yankee went eight innings without allowing an earned run for the second straight start. He’s 2-0 with a 0.00 ERA on the season. His strikeout-to-walk ratio sits at 8/1.

  • 3

The number of hits allowed by Greene. He also struck out three. The game was also the third shutout pitched by the Tigers this season. David Price and Anibal Sanchez gained the wins in those games.

  • 10

The number of pitches needed by closer Joakim Soria to work a perfect ninth. Soria lowered his ERA to 2.45 after the outing while making a strong case to retain closer duties once Joe Nathan returns.

  • 2

The number of hits by Jose Iglesias. The slick-fielding shortstop continues to impress with the bat after scoring a run and drawing a walk in the 2-0 win. He overtook teammate Miguel Cabrera for the American League lead in batting average.

Next up: the Tigers face the Pirates in the rubber match of the three-game series as Alfredo Simon takes on former Twin/White Sox Francisco Liriano.

For more Tigers, click here. For more baseball, click here.

6 Stats from the Detroit Tigers’ 7-1 Win over the Minnesota Twins

 

  • 1

The number of runs the Tigers allowed. Detroit surrendered a grand total of zero runs during the first two games. The only run the Twins scored was unearned.

  • 3

The number of hits by Anthony Gose. The center fielder collected three hits for the second straight game. He also scored three runs and stole a base. One of his three hits was a double.

(RELATED: Why You Shouldn’t Count the Tigers Out of the Playoffs)

  • 6

The number of walks drawn by the Tigers compared to just three strikeouts. The Twins struck out five times and only drew one walk.

  • 1

The number of innings threw by Tom Gorzelanny in relief. It was the former Pirate’s Detroit debut.

  • 8

The number of innings thrown by another Tiger making his Detroit debut, Shane Greene. Greene allowed four hits, an unearned run and a walk while striking out five.

  • 0.00

The Tigers pitchers’ collective ERA for the season following the game.

For more Tigers, click here. For more baseball, click here. 

5 Stats to Know from the Detroit Tigers’ 11-0 Win over the Minnesota Twins

 

  1. 4

The number of runs scored by catcher Alex Avila. Avila went 1-for-1 with three walks. His batting average on the season is .750. Shortstop Jose Iglesias had four hits for the Tigers. Avila and Iglesias, the team’s 8 and 9 hitters, combined to go 5-for-5 with four walks and seven runs scored. This is a good trend.

  1. 3

The number of hits by center fielder Anthony Gose in his Tigers debut. The former Blue Jay finished a home run short of the cycle. He also scored a run and drove in three runs while batting leadoff.

  1. .500

Ian Kinsler’s batting average over the first two games. The second baseman has multi-hit games in both contests this season while also contributing two runs scored, a double and four runs batted in—most of which came on Wednesday.

  1. 2

The number of runs driven in by Miguel Cabrera after going hitless in the first game. The future Hall of Famer drove in two runs on two hits, one of which was a double. He also registered a walk.

  1. 1

The number of hits allowed by four Detroit relievers after Anibal Sanchez threw 6.2 innings of 3-hit ball. Angel Nesbitt, Ian Krol,Al Alburquerque and Joakim Soria shut down the Twins in relief with Alburquerque allowing the only hit. Krol and two strikeouts in his inning of work while Alburquerque also struck out a batter.

All stats courtesy of Baseball-Reference.com unless otherwise noted.

For more Tigers, click here. For more MLB click here.

Detroit Tigers: How to Replace Max Scherzer

Changes are coming for the Detroit Tigers. Don’t worry, they won’t be wholesale. The team will still stick to its identity—superb starting pitching and a slugging, star-driven, high-scoring offense. While the bullpen, and to a lesser extent, the bench will likely be bolstered, there is yet another item that will force general manager Dave Dombrowski to make a transaction or two—replacing Max Scherzer.

The writing on the wall may have been the fact that the former Arizona Diamondback turned down a contract extension worth $144 million over six years. Since then, the public opinion thinks Scherzer will be playing for a different team come spring training. That may be public perception in Detroit’s front office as well. Dombrowski, in theory, has already acquired a replacement to take Scherzer’s spot on the front line next to Justin Verlander and Anibal Sanchez. That would be David Price. The fact that the Tigers’ acquired Price mere months after Scherzer turned down the contract could be coincidental, but at the very least served as a backup plan to losing Scherzer.

Here are some options Detroit will have to fill the potentially vacant spot in their rotation.

The Internal Guys

Detroit has a plethora of internal options. A plethora. However, none of the internal options pitched like Cy Young winners, or anywhere close to it. Outside of Scherzer, Verlander, Price, Sanchez, Rick Porcello and the departed Drew Smyly, the Tigers used five other starting pitchers in 2014. That group consisted of Robbie Ray, Buck Farmer, Kyle Lobstein, Kyle Ryan and Drew VerHagen. It’s hard to judge them too harshly. Four of the group are only 23 (Lobstein is the resident greybeard at 25) and none of the five pitched in the big leagues prior to the season. As hard as it is to judge the group, it’s equally as hard to find a front runner in terms of claiming a rotation spot. Lobstein appears to be the leader in the clubhouse. He made the postseason roster as a long reliever, and save a disastrous start in Minnesota, pitched well enough to keep the Tigers in games. However, the former Rays’ farmhand only managed to reach the seven innings pitched plateau once in his six starts. If he can last longer in games and stay effective, he should be the frontrunner of the internal options.

Outside of Lobstein, it’s hard to get a read on things. VerHagen and Ryan only started a game apiece while Farmer struggled immensely in two starts. (Ryan threw six shutout innings in his only start. After that he was limited to bullpen work where he pitched well. He may find it easier to make the team as a reliever than as a starter.)

Ray is the wild card of the bunch. The centerpiece of the return received for Doug Fister pitched exceptionally well in his first two starts. Over 11.1 innings he limited the opposition to one run on nine hits. His strikeout to walk ratio was 7-2. If he can pitch close to that mark for an entire season, then Dombrowski and manager Brad Ausmus should hand him the job outright. Then again, if Ray pitches like he did the rest of the way it will leave the door open for other pitchers. After those two sparkling starts and a brief, two out relief appearance in Boston, Ray’s ERA jumped nearly four runs from 0.75 to 4.70 after surrendering seven runs in 3.1 innings to Texas. It only got worse from their as he posted an 11.12 ERA in three August starts, giving up 14 runs and 20 hits in only 11.1 innings.

If Scherzer’s replacement is an internal option, it remains to be seen who it will be. Lobstein and Ray (should he turn it around) seem like they have the inside track. Still, it’s hard to evaluate a group of young pitchers.

The Free Agents

Outside of Scherzer, the other marquee free agent starting pitchers are Jon Lester and James Shields. Signing either would cost a similar amount of cash to Scherzer, plus the loss of a draft pick, so re-signing Scherzer would seem the most prudent play out of the three.

Still, if the team opts for another free agent to fill the void, or perhaps split time with an internal candidate, there are plenty of options. Options that, on the whole, come with a caveat. That caveat is that most starters available on the open market are either reclamation projects/ buy low candidates or pitchers looking for a big payday.

If the Tigers aren’t willing to commit anything close to Scherzer money on anyone other than Scherzer they should look for a cheaper option. A cheaper option that is more reliable than a buy low candidate. Signing someone like Jason Hammel or Roberto Hernandez would make sense. Neither will wow you with their numbers, but neither will completely implode either. They’d keep the Tigers in game as well as providing decent rotation depth. If the Tigers want a pitcher with a little more experience and one who could win them more games, Jake Peavy would be ideal. He’s no spring chicken at 33, but has been in plenty of pressure situations and knows the division well thanks to his time in Chicago. He won’t be cheap, but he’ll be cheaper than Scherzer.

James Shields could be an interesting target. First off, he’s cheaper than the other two premium starters on the market—Scherzer and Lester. Secondly, signing him away from Kansas City would be a major blow to Detroit’s biggest division rival.

The Trade Market

Their likely won’t be many pitchers of Scherzer’s caliber on the trade market. Knowing this, Detroit could look for a controllable, young, middle of the rotation type to fill the need. The Rays’ Jeremy Hellickson would make sense. Given the fact Tampa may not want to get into a situation with him where they pay him gobs of money and decide to move him instead—a la Scott Kazmir, David Price, James Shields, et al.

San Diego’s Tyson Ross and Ian Kennedy would also be pitchers to target. Ross has flourished as a starter in San Diego while Kennedy seems to have rebounded from a rough 2013. Before 2013, the former Yankee farmhand won 36 games between 2011 and 2012. One of Cincinnati’s may starting pitchers could also make sense.

In Conclusion

The simplest may just be to re-sign Scherzer, but should Detroit go another way, Dave Dombrowski will have plenty of options.

 

All stats courtesy of http://www.baseball-reference.com/ unless otherwise noted.

Detroit Tigers: Adept at Acquiring Rival Talent

Acquiring a player to strengthen your team is one thing, but when you weaken a rival in the process it’s a different kind of plus. On the other hand, if a rival team moved on from a player and you bring that player in from a different team, all it does is show your rivals what could have been—all the while making your team better.

Dave Dombrowski and the Detroit Tigers are exceptionally good at this.

Maybe the team’s brass thinks a player with extensive experience within the division will be a boost in terms of helping the Tigers win. Or maybe it’s just a huge coincidence, but Detroit has become a landing spot for former-division rivals.

An ever-present checklist item during Dombrowski’s tenure in Detroit, at least after he acquired Miguel Cabrera, has been to surround the former Marlin with sufficient protection and fire power. Cabrera has generally had an elite hitter placed near him in the middle of the order. Magglio Ordonez (who was acquired from a rival team, Chicago) was the first while the likes of Victor Martinez (another former rival) and Prince Fielder have followed. Because of the middle-of-the-order stability, Dombrowski has combed the market in search of hitters to fill out the rest of the order—or, in other terms, to add more fire power and length. Jhonny Peralta was one of those hitters, Delmon Young was another and Torii Hunter was another still. The underlying theme with all three is that they had experience in the AL Central. And in the case of Peralta and Young, both were directly acquired from rivals.

In Hunter’s case, as in Martinez’, the player was acquired after a stint away from the AL Central. The former Twin, Hunter, was signed via free agency after a stint in Anaheim while Martinez made a stop in Boston before also heading to Motown in free agency.

It isn’t just hitters; the Tigers have picked up relievers with extensive AL Central experience. Three of Brad Ausmus top options out the bullpen, Joakim Soria, Blaine Hardy and closer Joe Nathan, have been employed by rival teams. Soria and Hardy (although he never made the Major League roster) are former Royals while Joe Nathan made his name as Minnesota’s closer.

It may be coincidental, or purposeful, but the Tigers have a knack for acquiring rival team’s talent. Who needs advanced scouting when you can scout a player by seeing them play against your team 15-20 times a year?

MLB August Trades Part One: Winners

Baseball’s biggest trade deadline is July 31st. Up until that date players can be moved without passing through waivers. After the 31st, players must be subjected to waivers if they are to be dealt. In the waiver process, the team with the worst record in the same league gets first crack at the player. After that it is passed to the next worst team in the league. If no team from the same league claims a player, he is put through the same process in the opposite league starting with the worst team from a record standpoint.

If a player is claimed, the team that put him on waivers can either work out a trade, simply let the claiming team assume is salary, or pull the player off waivers and keep him on the team. The caveat with the last statement is that once a player is pulled back, they can’t be dealt.

Most August trades generally have minimal impact. Most are salary dumps or simply teams shedding excess players for little-to-no return. Here are the winners (if you can call them that). Check back tomorrow for the losers (again, if you can call them that) and teams who could have done more.

Winners:

Los Angeles Dodgers

When healthy the Dodgers will have a glut of starting pitchers—and then maybe another glut on top of that. But the rub is that most of them aren’t healthy. Chad Billingsley hasn’t pitched yet while Josh Beckett and Paul Maholm are likely out for the year. In addition to those three, the team also has a healthy Clayton Kershaw, Zack Greinke, Hyun-Jin Ryu and Dan Haren. With no suitable options for the fifth spot in the rotation, LA acquired Phillies’ pitcher Roberto Hernandez (formerly known as Fausto Carmona) and Kevin Correia from the Twins. Neither has been Orel Hershiser, but both have filled a need. Both are rental players and likely won’t be in Dodger blue next season, but they’ve helped Los Angeles maintain the lead in the NL West.

Chicago Cubs

The Cubs acquired former top prospect Jacob Turner for two Class A pitchers. Chicago is in the midst of hoarding as much young talent as they can. Whether it’s to feature the youngsters on their next contending team, or to flip some of them for an established star to help the team improve, every piece helps. The fact that Theo Epstein acquired a player once regarded as an elite prospect, and still could realize that potential, for two A-ball pitchers is a massive coup.

Oakland A’s

Billy Beane made headlines for trading Yoenis Cespedes for Jon Lester. Despite the fact that the team acquired Jonny Gomes in addition to Lester, Oakland’s offense has struggled without the Cuban slugger. Adding Adam Dunn for a relatively low price will greatly improve the Athletics’ suddenly dwindling playoff chances. His tendency to hit for a low batting average isn’t the best trait to have, but the former Cincinnati Reds slugger walks a lot, which will be appreciated greatly in Oakland.  Batting average and walks aside, Dunn’s tremendous power will help the A’s recover from losing Cespedes.

Check back tomorrow for August’s losers and teams who could have done more.  Did I miss any team? Who do you think was a big winner?